The Good Class: Television’s Best Show Takes Us to School, This Time Literally

Posted on November 22, 2019 at 8:04 am

“The Good Place” is my favorite show, and I love the way it grapples with the deepest questions of existence in a sophisticated and nuanced but remarkably accessible (and funny and endearing) way. What does it mean to be a good person? Why should we try to be good? What do we owe each other? I watch every week, then listen to the terrific podcast with Marc Evan Jackson (who plays Sean, the head demon), then watch the episode again to catch the details they discuss. The podcast features actors, behind-the-scenes people like writers, producers, special effects, set, and costume designers, and you might even hear a real expert on moral philosophy.

And so of course the has become a text, with “The Good Class” being taught at Notre Dame. I love the description of the answers they got to the application for admission and the comments from “Good Place” creator Mike Shur.

The Good Class, at least, provides one place where people convene every week to talk about what they just saw.

“ the idea of what it means to watch and debate television like this together. To use television as a vehicle. It’s hard to talk about ethical issues these days. It’s hard to have a common language that’s not hyper politicized or hyper reductive,” Sullivan says. “We need cultural questions like this to do some of the 2,400-year-old work on our souls.”

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Spiritual films Television

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