2 Replies to “Helping Visually Impaired “See” Movies”

  1. Years ago, before DVS, I went to movies with a friend who was legally blind. I can remember the first movie he asked me to attend. It was “Dances with Wolves.” I wasn’t quite expecting him to want me to tell him what was happening, and that was a doozy of a movie to describe, but I did my best. We went to several more movies together, in the matinees to avoid disturbing others. After getting past the faux pas of talking in a theater, I can remember thinking that there needed to be something that would give greater visual access to movies. And now we have sensory-friendly showings/performances as well! Long ago, my husband and I started putting captions on for our movies at home, so we could turn the volume down to avoid disturbing our children and still get all the dialogue. Assistive technologies can have far-reaching applications!

    1. You are so right, Donna! Captions have also been proven to be very helpful to ESL and they are the second-highest group of users of the technology.

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