Exclusive Trailer Preview: Apple of My Eye with Burt Reynolds and Amy Smart

Posted on November 14, 2016 at 7:00 am

“Apple of My Eye” is a warm and inspiring family film, debuting on DVD and digital January 10, 2017 from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment.

Copyright 2017 Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
Copyright 2017 Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

A young girl (Avery Arendes), who defines herself by her equestrian abilities, struggles after she loses her eyesight following a traumatic accident. Her world changes when she meets her new companion and set of eyes, the miniature horse Apple. It stars Amy Smart (“Rat Race”) and Avery Arendes (“Albion: The Enchanted Stallion”), with Liam McIntyre (“The Flash”) and Academy Award® nominee and Emmy Award® winner Burt Reynolds.

The DVD and digital releases of the movie come with special features that the whole family can enjoy, including a blooper reel, deleted scenes and a special “Doggywood Featurette.” In this piece, viewers can hear from the Southeastern Guide Dogs team about their involvement in the making of this heartfelt film.

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Trailers, Previews, and Clips

At Long Last: At Long Last Love

Posted on June 10, 2013 at 3:59 pm

“At Long Last Love” was one of the most derided films of its era, mostly for reasons that had nothing to do with the film.  Director Peter Bogdanovich had left his wife for his star, Cybill Shepherd, and ticket-buyers were offended or annoyed by their behavior and constant appearances in the media.  And it was the wrong time.  Audiences wanted gritty, serious movies in 1975, movies like Bogdanovich’s own “Paper Moon” and “Last Picture Show.”  “At Long Last Love” was a throwback to the elegant trifles of the 1930’s, set to the lesser-known songs of Cole Porter.  Bogdanovich insisted on casting Burt Reynolds — not known for his singing — as the leading man.  And, as with “Les Miserables” last year, he insisted on recording all of the songs live on the movie set, which is a challenge for even the most classically trained singers.

I liked it, even back then.  I liked the songs and the glamour.  But it was a flop.

Bogdanovich tells the remarkable story behind the release of a new, re-cut version, for the first time on Blu-Ray, in a recent blog post.  This re-release, re-cut without permission or even the knowledge of Bogdanovich, is being released with his enthusiastic approval, and the movie is well worth a look.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x8EQn5ZAQ1k
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Musical Neglected gem

Mystery, Alaska

Posted on December 13, 2002 at 5:16 am

The coming attraction makes it clear that “Mystery, Alaska” is your basic “Rocky” movie about a grown-up version of the Mighty Ducks — a team from a small, hockey-worshipping Alaska town gets a chance to play the New York Rangers. So we expect your basic redemption through sports plot, including the death of a loveable character, the healing of old wounds, the learning of important lessons about teamwork and pride, endearingly quirky players, deeper understanding and acceptance between family members, a young player just beginning and an older one approaching time to hang up his skates, and at least one speech about how our guys don’t play for money, they play for the love of the game! And we settle back, waiting for our hearts to be warmed.

Not that there’s anything wrong with that. The reason that formulas endure is that they usually work, as long as the details are all right and there is nothing too overtly manipulative, and nothing that interferes with our ability to suspend disbelief. And here the details are pretty good, especially the feel of the remote, snowy town, where kids skate the river and make out in snowplows and everyone turns out every week to watch the Saturday hockey game. And there are fine ensemble performances. The hockey game is pretty good, too. And there are a couple of very funny guest cameos to pick things up near the end.

Prodigal son Charles Danner (Hank Azaria), who left to be a big city writer, brings in the Rangers after his article about the weekly game in Mystery, Alaska. Despite the fact that the town judge (Burt Reynolds) cautions against it, urging the town to cling to their illusions and their dignity, the people cannot resist their chance at the big time. Local sheriff John Biebe (Russell Crowe), just dropped from the team to make room for a high school student who skates like a rocket, agrees to coach. Everyone has issues to resolve – the judge is harsh and rigid, the high school kid and his girlfriend are exploring sex, the sheriff’s difficulty in being cut from the team comes just as his wife’s former boyfriend shows up, the town lothario (Ron Eldard) has some unfinished business with a couple of different women and one angry husband, a huge chain store is thinking of coming to town to compete with the local businesses, and those Rangers look awfully big up close.

It is all very predictable, but also very watchable. I predict that they’ll get at least one “the feel-good movie of the year!” blurb for the newspaper ads. And they might even be right.

Parents should know that there is very strong and very vivid language, including locker-room style descriptions of sex, a child’s use of four- letter words played for humor, a wounded man’s use of very strong language played for humor, a character who has casual sex with almost every woman he meets (and who apologizes to the husband of one of them, with no suggestion that this might make the woman seem like property), explicit depictions of sexual encounters, including one between teenagers, and some violence (punched noses, semi-accidental shooting resulting in minor injury). The teen-age girl says that she wants to have sex because she is afraid of losing her boyfriend, which parents may want to discuss. The boy makes it clear that he is perfectly comfortable with waiting, and does not want to do it for that reason. They then go ahead, but are not able to complete the act, which causes great feelings of insecurity for both of them. Her mother, though clearly uncomfortable, responds with sympathy and support.

Families who enjoy this movie will also enjoy the original Rocky and Crowe’s performances in The Insider and A Beautiful Mind.

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