Nell Scovell Talks About The Groundbreaking Sabrina, The Teenage Witch

Posted on October 4, 2021 at 12:13 pm

Copyright 1996 Viacom
It was 25 years ago that “Sabrina the Teenage Witch” premiered as a part of ABC’s “TGIF” line-up of family-friendly shows. The character was based on the Archie comic book series, but it was showrunner Nell Scovell who gave her a last name and a subtly but unabashedly feminist spin. In a 25th anniversary interview, Scovell told Elle that what made it fun for her was a twist on the magical female stories like “Bewitched” and “I Dream of Jeannie.” Those characters had to hide their powers. Sabrina, who only discovers her powers when she turns 16 and is thus still learning how to use them, is encouraged to make the most of her gifts. She had some of Scovell in her as well. “The revolutionary idea of Sabrina is she’s a good kid. She doesn’t want to be a cheerleader popular. She, like me, wanted to be good in school, and a good person.”

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Google Salutes Audrey Hepburn

Posted on May 4, 2014 at 9:42 am

Today Google pays tribute to Audrey Hepburn, a movie star of impeccable elegance and grace on what would have been the 85th birthday.  It’s a great reason to watch these unmissable classics.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sorbncQusuk

Roman Holiday Hepburn became a star and won her first Oscar for playing a runaway princess who meets up with a handsome reporter (Gregory Peck). Peck loved to tell the story about how he surprised her in this scene.  He did not tell her what he was going to do with his hand and that reaction from her is pure Audrey, no acting involved.

My Fair Lady Hepburn plays Eliza Doolittle, the flower girl who wants to learn to speak English well enough to work in a flower shop and ends up enchanting royalty and, an even tougher task, the irascible Professor Higgins.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sr3h2_p2iyw

How to Steal a Million The most glamorous art thieves ever are Audrey Hepburn and Peter O’Toole in this glossy romantic comedy.

Sabrina A chauffeur’s daughter dreams of marrying her employer’s handsome playboy son (William Holden) until his stern businessman brother (Humphrey Bogart) tries to distract her.  This was Hepburn’s first film featuring gowns by the man who would become her signature designer, Givenchy.  Their work together made her a fashion icon.

Breakfast At Tiffany’s Hepburn plays Holly Golightly, a party girl trying to take care of herself in New York, but fighting her feelings for the writer downstairs.

Funny Face Hepburn stars with Fred Astaire in a musical about a bookish girl who accepts a modeling job in Paris so she can meet her idol, a French philosopher, but finds herself falling for the urbane photographer to the music of George Gershwin.

Two for the Road One of the wisest, wittiest, and most romantic films of all time follows a young couple (Hepburn and Albert Finney) as they travel through Europe in different stages of their relationship, from meeting as young students to newlyweds, new parents, disappointed early middle-age, and the possibility of renewal.

Charade Hepburn stars with Cary Grant in the most romantic thriller ever made, a sophisticated crime caper to a swoony Henry Mancini score.

Audrey_Hepburn

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