Christmas with a Capital C

Posted on November 1, 2011 at 9:05 am

B
Lowest Recommended Age: Kindergarten - 3rd Grade
MPAA Rating: Not Rated
Profanity: None
Alcohol/ Drugs: None
Violence/ Scariness: None
Diversity Issues: A theme of the movie
Date Released to Theaters: 2011
Date Released to DVD: November 1, 2011
Amazon.com ASIN: B005BRFN8Q

This Dove-approved family film stars Ted McGinley and Daniel Baldwin as one-time high school rivals who find themselves on opposite sides again when they battle over Christmas decorations in a small Alaska town and learn that Christmas is not about what is displayed but what is felt and shared.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MkK30YFv9u0
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Happy Birthday Aishwarya Rai!

Posted on November 1, 2011 at 8:51 am

Often described as “the most beautiful woman in the world,” former Miss World Aishwarya Rai has made movies in Hindi, Tamil, English and Bengali, including the Bollywood-ized “Bride and Prejudice.”  Her first child with her husband, actor Abhishek Bachchan, is due this month and we wish her and her family all the best.

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A New (Old) Book from Dr. Seuss

Posted on November 1, 2011 at 8:00 am

On Boing Boing, Cory Doctorow reviews a new collection of stories from Dr. Seuss, published for the first time in book form: The Bippilo Seed and Other Lost Stories.  Doctorow says, “The illustrations are classic Seuss and full of wit and irreverence, though the ratio of words to pictures is a lot wordier than the typical Seuss, owing, I suppose, to the constraints of the original magazine publication.”  He especially recommends The Great Henry McBride, “about a young fellow who can’t make up his mind on a single career and demands that the world accommodate his wish for excitement and novelty through his whole life.”  And there’s an audio book, with Neal Patrick Harris, Anjelica Huston, Joan Cusack, Jason Lee, Edward Hermann, Peter Dinklage, and William H Macy as an “indispensable companion.”

 

 

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The Appeal and Frustration of Ambiguous Movie Endings

Posted on November 1, 2011 at 8:00 am

I like Ann Hornaday’s piece in the Washington Post about ambiguous endings.

In “The Film Snob’s Dictionary,” writers David Kamp and Lawrence Levi cheekily chart out the differences between Movies and Films (“It’s a Movie if it’s black-and-white because it’s old. It’s a Film if it’s black-and-white because it’s Jarmuschy.”) They might have added another definition: It’s a Movie if it ends. It’s a Film if it stops.

Studio films tend to spell everything out — motivations, backstories — while independent films invite the audience to fill in the blanks or just ponder the unanswerable.  One reason for that is money.  Studio films are expensive and have to appeal to the broadest possible audience.  The more money you spend, the more people weigh in on the film’s artistic choices, and the more people weigh in, generally speaking, the more questions get answered on screen.

Of course, even the most definitive-appearing ending leaves a lot open for discussion.  Does finding out what “Rosebud” means in “Citizen Kane answer a question or raise a dozen more?  What happens after Rhett tells Scarlett he does not give a damn what happens to her?  Does anyone ever open that crate in the government warehouse and find the Lost Ark of the Covenant?  What exactly does “happily ever after” mean?

Hornaday discusses some of this year’s most open-ended movies, including “Take Shelter,” “Martha Marcy May Marlene,” and “Meek’s Cutoff.”  I love to come out of a movie and talk about what I think happens next, don’t you?  Do you have a favorite theory about an ambiguous ending?

 

 

 

 

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