Google Helps You Find Iconic Movie Locations — Re-enacting Is Up To You!

Posted on February 9, 2020 at 8:52 am

I live near some of the most iconic locations in the movies (though of course many movie versions of the White House and monuments are re-created in Hollywood). Tourists love to visit the Exorcist steps.

And they there’s this scene at the Lincoln Memorial in “Forrest Gump.”

Harry Medved has a great book about movie locations in Southern California. What movie locations have you visited?

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Understanding Media and Pop Culture

Leslie Combemale on 2019’s Best Female Filmmakers

Posted on January 3, 2020 at 8:00 am

Copyright Annapurna 2019

Cinema Siren and founder of Women Rocking Hollywood Leslie Combemale has a great write-up of the best female filmmakers in 2019. Her list includes mainstream Oscar contenders like Marielle Heller’s “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” to international films like the gorgeous period romantic drama “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” and the uplifting story of an immigrant teenager in love with the music of Bruce Springsteen “Blinded by the Light,” and the endearing indie “Booksmart” from director Olivia Wilde.

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Gender and Diversity Understanding Media and Pop Culture

Scout Tafoya on Martin Scorsese and “Late” Movies

Posted on November 24, 2019 at 8:00 am

My friend and fellow critic Scout Tafoya has written my favorite piece of movie criticism I’ve read in a long time. I have mixed feelings about Martin Scorsese’s new epic film, “The Irishman,” but the part I liked best is exactly what he describes here.

Fear of death and refusal of old age in movie-making are as old as the moving image itself. Movie stars date appallingly young, and directors sew bone-deep terror of mortality into their images. Film critic André Bazin famously defined the ontology of cinema according to its “mummy complex,” its embalming of time and space. And true to form, something uniquely bizarre occurs when film directors near the death at which they’ve been thumbing their nose by preserving slices of life for one and all to experience. The “late film” has become a class unto itself: what happens to your work if you know this will be one of the last times you point a camera at someone and yell, “Action!”?

It’s a pleasure to read, so wise about movies and about life.

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Critics Film History Movie History Understanding Media and Pop Culture

Netflix Thinks You can Speed-Read a Movie — Filmmakers Do Not Agree

Posted on October 29, 2019 at 10:59 am

Podcast listeners sometimes use the option to speed up the audio to get the information more quickly. Now Netflix is trying the same thing with video. Entertainment Weekly reports:

What if you could watch every episode of Breaking Bad and Stranger Things 50 percent faster?

That’s a feature that Netflix is quietly testing, and it’s quickly drawn a big backlash from Hollywood creatives.
First noted by Android Police, savvy mobile users of the streaming service spotted a new feature on the Netflix Android app that allowed subscribers to speed up (or slow down) playback without muting the volume (to playback speeds 0.5x, 0.75x, 1.0x, 1.25x or 1.5x, respectively). The feature is not unlike what most podcast and audiobook apps already have and is used by some listeners to consume content more quickly (or, in some cases, to slow it down if they have a difficult time understanding it).

The first-blush response from industry creatives, however, was not good. Turns out filmmakers don’t like the idea of viewers watching their painstakingly crafted work on Chimpmunks mode.

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