Tribute: Philip Seymour Hoffman

Posted on February 2, 2014 at 6:09 pm

PhilipSeymourHoffmanOscar-winning Philip Seymour Hoffman, who struggled with drug abuse, died today of an apparent drug overdose at age 46. Hoffman, often referred to as the most talented actor of his generation, was an actor of unsurpassed scope, dedication, and intelligence.

The contributors to Rogerebert.com paid tribute to Hoffman. Former USA Today journalist Susan Wloszczyna recalled interviewing Hoffman for his first major profile.

He spoke of his Rochester childhood—he especially looked up to his mom, a judge and lawyer who had raised three kids alone. It was soon apparent he had more respect for the stage than the movies. He was deeply disappointed in me that I had chosen Chicago as my husband’s first Broadway show instead of the more challenging revival of Cabaret directed by Sam Mendes. Hoffman was far from loquacious that day—he saved whatever intense emotions he harbored for the characters he played.

Ali Arikan wrote:

Philip Seymour Hoffman was a brave performer in every sense. He gave his characters his all. To watch him at his peak in films like “The Master,” or “Magnolia,” or “Synecdoche, New York” was to experience a beautiful rawness. That honesty, as well as his amazing talent, allowed him to master a truly unbelievable range. He belongs in the pantheon of the greats.

For New York Magazine’s Vulture, David Edelstein wrote:

When you hear about cutting-room fights, it almost always means the star thinks he or she is coming off as too unlikable and wants the director to ratchet up the vulnerability quotient. But Hoffman was arguing to make Capote lessattractive—to make him, in fact, thoroughly reprehensible. He said he told Miller, “The way toward empathy is actually to be as hard as possible on this character.”

I said I had no idea what he was talking about.

“I think deep down inside, people understand how flawed they are,” he said. “I think the more benign you make somebody, the less truthful it is.”

 

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Actors

Charlie Chaplin’s 100th Year of Movies

Posted on February 2, 2014 at 8:00 am

One hundred years ago this week, British music hall star Charlie Chaplin made his first Hollywood film, the silent “It’s a Living.”

It would be a little while before his classic character of the little tramp really came together.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iu-rLA4POkI

He became an international superstar without saying a word.  He had unparalleled physical wit and timing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTt2f-DReYY

He could make you laugh and break your heart at the same moment.

Here the blind girl who thought he was a millionaire when she could not see, and knew him only by the touch of his hand, discovers that he is a poor man who gave up everything to pay for the operation to restore her sight.

His movies are still timely for their commentary on society.

Robert Downey, Jr. played him brilliantly in the biopic “Chaplin.”

I also recommend Stephen Weissman’s superb biography, Chaplin: A Life.

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Classic Comedy Shorts

This is Why I’m Rooting for the Seahawks

Posted on February 2, 2014 at 6:00 am

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=776fI6NZLFA

The first legally deaf NFL player surprises his two biggest fans.  P.S.  Did you know that the football huddle was invented by the deaf players at Gallaudet University so that the opposing team would not see their hand signals?

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