Original Version: Far from the Madding Crowd

Posted on April 29, 2015 at 8:00 am

Copyright MGM 1967
Copyright MGM 1967

Thomas Hardy’s classic novel Far from the Madding Crowd is the story of headstrong Bathsheba Everdene, who inherits a farm and who receives marriage proposals from three very different men. A new version starring Carey Mulligan, Michael Sheen, Tom Sturridge, and Matthias Schoenaerts opens this Friday.

The 1967 version starred Julie Christie, Terence Stamp, Peter Finch, and Alan Bates.

PBS showed a Masterpiece classics version in 1998.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWoUBO_nmtI

A silent version came out exactly 100 years ago, in 1915.

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Based on a book Original Version

Meryl Streep Supports Women Screenwriters

Posted on April 28, 2015 at 3:59 pm

Meryl Streep has made a contribution to a lab program for women over 40 who write movies.

The only program of its kind, The Writers Lab evolved in recognition of the absence of the female voice in narrative film, along with the dearth of support for script development. The lab offers 8 promising films by women over 40 a springboard to production.

The Lab will take place September 18-20, 2015 at Wiawaka Center for Women on Lake George. Caroline Kaplan (Time Out of Mind, Personal Velocity), Kirsten Smith (Legally Blond, Ten Things I Hate About You), Jessica Bendinger (Bring It On, Aquamarine), Mary Jane Skalski (Win Win, The Station Agent), Gina Prince-Bythewood (Secret Life of Bees, Beyond the Lights) among others will be serving as mentors, pending scheduling. Mentors advise in one-on-one meetings with additional events to inspire artists to hone their creative vision. The Lab will take place September 18-20, 2015 at Wiawaka Center for Women on Lake George. Caroline Kaplan (Time Out of Mind, Personal Velocity), Kirsten Smith (Legally Blond, Ten Things I Hate About You), Jessica Bendinger (Bring It On, Aquamarine), Mary Jane Skalski (Win Win, The Station Agent), Gina Prince-Bythewood (Secret Life of Bees, Beyond the Lights) among others will be serving as mentors, pending scheduling. Mentors advise in one-on-one meetings with additional events to inspire artists to hone their creative vision.

For submission information or to apply, see the Writer’s Lab.

And here is Ms. Streep talking about why we need more women’s stories.

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Gender and Diversity Writers

Tony Nominations 2015

Posted on April 28, 2015 at 3:29 pm

The Tony nominations are out! I was delighted to see “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time” get several nominations, including best play, best actor Alex Sharp, and best director Marianne Elliott. It is one of the most stunning evenings I have ever spent in the theater, with astonishing stagecraft that takes the audience inside the mind of an autistic teenager. It was even nominated for best choreography, although there is no dancing, just movement.

It’s nice to see Bradley Cooper nominated for his passion project, “The Elephant Man.” And it is very good to see special Tony awards going to John Cameron Mitchell, whose “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” has been a smash hit with Neil Patrick Harris, Darren Criss, and Michael C. Hall, and to the long-legged Broadway dancer Tommy Tune.

Best Musical

An American in Paris

Fun Home

Something Rotten!

The Visit

Best Play

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Disgraced

Hand to God

Wolf Hall Parts 1 and 2

Best Musical Revival

The King and I

On the Town

On the Twentieth Century

Best Play Revival

The Elephant Man

Skylight

This Is Our Youth

You Can’t Take It With You

Best Leading Actor in a Play

Steven Boyer, ‘Hand to God’ (In Performance Video)

Bradley Cooper, ‘The Elephant Man’

Ben Miles, ‘Wolf Hall Parts 1 and 2’

Bill Nighy, ‘Skylight’

Alex Sharp, ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time’

Best Leading Actress in a Play

Geneva Carr, ‘Hand to God’

Helen Mirren, ‘The Audience’

Elisabeth Moss, ‘The Heidi Chronicles’

Carey Mulligan, ‘Skylight’

Ruth Wilson, ‘Constellations’

Best Leading Actor in a Musical

Michael Cerveris, ‘Fun Home’

Robert Fairchild, ‘An American in Paris’

Brian d’Arcy James, ‘Something Rotten!’

Ken Watanabe, ‘The King and I’

Tony Yazbeck, ‘On the Town’

Best Leading Actress in a Musical

Kristin Chenoweth, ‘On the Twentieth Century’

Leanne Cope, ‘An American in Paris’

Beth Malone, ‘Fun Home’

Kelli O’Hara, ‘The King and I’

Chita Rivera, ‘The Visit’

Best Book of a Musical

‘An American in Paris,’ Craig Lucas

‘Fun Home,’ Lisa Kron

‘Something Rotten!,’ Karey Kirkpatrick and John O’Farrell

‘The Visit,’Terrence McNally

Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics)

‘Fun Home,’ Music: Jeanine Tesori, Lyrics: Lisa Kron

‘The Last Ship,’Music and Lyrics: Sting (In Performance Video)

‘Something Rotten!,’ Music and Lyrics: Wayne Kirkpatrick and Karey Kirkpatrick

‘The Visit,’ Music: John Kander, Lyrics: Fred Ebb

Best Featured Actor in a Play

Matthew Beard, ‘Skylight’

K. Todd Freeman, ‘Airline Highway’

Richard McCabe, ‘The Audience’

Alessandro Nivola, ‘The Elephant Man’

Nathaniel Parker, ‘Wolf Hall Parts 1 and 2’

Micah Stock, ‘It’s Only a Play’

Best Featured Actress in a Play

Annaleigh Ashford, ‘You Can’t Take It with You’

Patricia Clarkson, ‘The Elephant Man’

Lydia Leonard, ‘Wolf Hall Parts 1 and 2’

Sarah Stiles, ‘Hand to God’

Julie White, ‘Airline Highway’

Best Featured Actor in a Musical

Christian Borle, ‘Something Rotten!’

Andy Karl, ‘On the Twentieth Century’

Brad Oscar, ‘Something Rotten!’

Brandon Uranowitz, ‘An American in Paris’

Max von Essen, ‘An American in Paris’

Best Featured Actress in a Musical

Victoria Clark, ‘Gigi’

Judy Kuhn, ‘Fun Home’

Sydney Lucas, ‘Fun Home’

Ruthie Ann Miles, ‘The King and I’

Emily Skeggs, ‘Fun Home’

Best Scenic Design of a Play

Bunny Christie and Finn Ross, ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time’

Bob Crowley, ‘Skylight’

Christopher Oram, ‘Wolf Hall Parts 1 and 2’

David Rockwell, ‘You Can’t Take It with You’

Best Scenic Design of a Musical

Bob Crowley and 59 Productions, ‘An American in Paris’

David Rockwell, ‘On the Twentieth Century’

Michael Yeargan, ‘The King and I’

David Zinn, ‘Fun Home’

Best Costume Design of a Play

Bob Crowley, ‘The Audience’

Jane Greenwood, ‘You Can’t Take It with You’

Christopher Oram, ‘Wolf Hall Parts 1 and 2’

David Zinn, ‘Airline Highway’

Best Costume Design of a Musical

Gregg Barnes, ‘Something Rotten!’

Bob Crowley, ‘An American in Paris’

William Ivey Long, ‘On the Twentieth Century’

Catherine Zuber, ‘The King and I’

Best Lighting Design of a Play

Paule Constable, ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time’

Paule Constable and David Plater, ‘Wolf Hall Parts 1 and 2’

Natasha Katz, ‘Skylight’

Japhy Weideman, ‘Airline Highway’

Best Lighting Design of a Musical

Donald Holder, ‘The King and I’

Natasha Katz, ‘An American in Paris’

Ben Stanton, ‘Fun Home’

Japhy Weideman, ‘The Visit’

Best Direction of a Play

Stephen Daldry, ‘Skylight’

Marianne Elliott, ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time’

Scott Ellis, ‘You Can’t Take It with You’

Jeremy Herrin, ‘Wolf Hall Parts 1 and 2’

Moritz von Stuelpnagel, ‘Hand to God’

Best Direction of a Musical

Sam Gold, ‘Fun Home’

Casey Nicholaw, ‘Something Rotten!’

John Rando, ‘On the Town’

Bartlett Sher, ‘The King and I’

Christopher Wheeldon, ‘An American in Paris’

Best Choreography

Joshua Bergasse, ‘On the Town’

Christopher Gattelli, ‘The King and I’

Scott Graham & Steven Hoggett for Frantic Assembly, ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time’

Casey Nicholaw, ‘Something Rotten!’

Christopher Wheeldon, ‘An American in Paris’

Best Orchestrations

Christopher Austin, Don Sebesky, Bill Elliott, ‘An American in Paris’

John Clancy, ‘Fun Home’

Larry Hochman, ‘Something Rotten!’

Rob Mathes, ‘The Last Ship’

Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Theater

Tommy Tune

Isabelle Stevenson Tony Award

Stephen Schwartz

Regional Theatre Tony Award

Cleveland Play House

Special Tony Award

John Cameron Mitchell, ‘Hedwig and the Angry Inch’

Tony Honors for Excellence in the Theater

Arnold Abramson

Adrian Bryan-Brown

Gene O’Donovan

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Awards Live Theater

Men in Suits: Costume Designers Talk about “Scandal,” “Mad Men,” and More Suit-Wearing Characters on TV

Posted on April 27, 2015 at 3:27 pm

Copyright 2015 Lionsgate Television
Copyright 2015 Lionsgate Television

The women’s clothes get all the attention, but for a costume designer — and for the actor — a suit is just as important. Indiewire spoke to costume designers about what the suits worn on “Mad Men,” “Scandal,” “Better Call Saul,” “Ray Donovan,” “The Good Wife,” “Black-ish,” “Revenge,” and, of course, “Suits” tell us about the characters and the story.

Bryant communicates Don’s point of view by relying on her own impression of the character. She “envisioned him a character of secrecy, mystery, and seduction” (which is a pretty succinct characterization, if you know Don) and translated that vision “into a minimal, masculine palette of grays, blacks, deep burgundy and navy,” which underscores her ethos of “evoking emotion and telling the story of the characters.”

Copyright 2015 Wilmore Films
Copyright 2015 Wilmore Films

Andre’s style may not be as traditional as the other guys of this list, but he’s as dapper as they come. The fashion choices Dre makes, according to Beverly Stacy, designer for “Black-ish,” “are dictated by his background and experience.” He has a laid-back, West Coast aesthetic that marries an upscale tone with modern lines, defining what Stacy calls, “Hip Hop Couture.”

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