Chick Flicks On Demand to Support Breast Cancer Research

Posted on October 2, 2010 at 3:55 pm

Warner Brothers Digital Distribution will support Susan G. Komen for the Cure in the fight against breast cancer every time one of 16 special movies is watched On Demand during a special initiative this month. So get a bowl of popcorn (and a hanky — there are some real weepies here) and settle back with “The Notebook,” “City of Angels,” “In the Land of Women,” “Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood” and more, and enjoy the movie while you feel good about helping to end this terrible disease. (If you feel more like laughing than crying, try some of the other choices like “Miss Congeniality 2,” “Fool’s Gold,” or “Music & Lyrics.”)

Related Tags:

 

After the kids go to bed Television

List: Movie Mom’s Favorites for Halloween

Posted on October 2, 2010 at 8:00 am

Many
thanks to Jennifer Kachler, Adam Donald, Daniel Sheppard, Brian Gonzalez, my homegirl
Laine Kaplowitz, and everyone at the fabulous Bethesda Row Theatre.

Related Tags:

 

Elementary School For Your Netflix Queue Holidays Lists Movie Mom’s Top Picks for Families

Violence in Movies Shown on Airplanes

Posted on October 1, 2010 at 7:32 am

The only truly captive audience for movies is airline passengers. You do not have to put on the headset, but if you are disturbed or offended by what is on screen there is no way to turn it off. Airlines will edit the films for language or nudity and sex, but (other than plane crash scenes) they keep in the violence and parents with small children have no way to protect them from those images. A group called Kids Safe Films is calling on the airlines to do better.

On a 2006 US Airways flight, the in-flight airline movie screen dropped down from the overhead and began showing images of incredible violence. A drive-by shooting, a child crushed to death by a car, kids swapping guns. And that was in the first five minutes of the film. What’s crazy is that children on the flight were watching these images regardless of whether or not their parents purchased headsets. All because the screens were positioned so that everyone could see them. On other more recent flights, parents have struggled to protect their kids from images of murder, torture, melting faces and death – all shown on publicly viewable screens.

The American Medical Association reports numerous studies which prove that exposure to violent images is harmful to children.

And yet, here in America, in the only situation in which parents are unable to walk away from a TV screen, change the channel or even turn the TV off, their kids are force fed images of horrific violence – against their will, against the recommendation of the Medical Experts and against the guidelines set by Hollywood as put forth by the MPAA.

Their concerns are measured and their goals are modest. They applaud the airlines that either do not show movies or have 100% individual screens. They are not asking airlines to show children’s movies, they are not suing anyone (how refreshing!), and they are not raising money (even more refreshing). They are urging the airlines and movie studios to act on their own, but support legislation if that does not happen. They are gathering signatures on a petition and I support their efforts.

Related Tags:

 

Parenting Understanding Media and Pop Culture
THE MOVIE MOM® is a registered trademark of Nell Minow. Use of the mark without express consent from Nell Minow constitutes trademark infringement and unfair competition in violation of federal and state laws. All material © Nell Minow 1995-2019, all rights reserved, and no use or republication is permitted without explicit permission. This site hosts Nell Minow’s Movie Mom® archive, with material that originally appeared on Yahoo! Movies, Beliefnet, and other sources. Much of her new material can be found at Rogerebert.com, Huffington Post, and WheretoWatch. Her books include The Movie Mom’s Guide to Family Movies and 101 Must-See Movie Moments, and she can be heard each week on radio stations across the country.

Website Designed by Max LaZebnik